Teachers in the OSU/RSC PD Program

Quotes from Teachers

“The work has been the most challenging, but also the most rewarding, professional experience of my career.  Without the ongoing support I would not have been able to successfully integrate these approaches at such a deep level.  I feel fortunate to have had a mentor who has both supported and challenged me to continue to grow in order to provide rich learning experiences for my students.” Lorraine Gaughenbaugh, 2012

“Quite honestly, if I hadn’t met with you and with other teachers to plan, talk, share our struggles, and gain new ideas, I don’t think I would have continued.”  Megan Ballinger, 2012

“This whole approach to learning is a very long journey and a complex process…Sometimes I make little steps and other times I can leap forward. I just want to keep moving in the right direction.” Anon, 2010

“Working with you and others involved in the program has been the most transformational opportunities I’ve ever had in PD.  The conversations, collaborations, experiences, and opportunities to share what I’ve experienced were invaluable.  When I present or share this work with colleagues they often seem just as blown away as I’ve been.”  Jill Sampson, 2012

“The most invaluable part of the training has been the opportunity to work closely with other teachers to collaborate on lesson plans and share best practices.  Without their input and feedback I don’t think I would have continued to implement the strategies in my classroom.”  Jessica Sharp, 2012

Building Community of Practice 2009-12

In leading the professional development of the teachers at Ohio State 2009-12 I mediated, built on, and extended beyond RSC-led workshops to develop the sort of community of practice that teacher education research has shown is the only effective way of significantly changing classroom practice.   Teachers learned how to use in their own classrooms what they had experienced with the RSC.  Many also learned additional pedagogies and analytical frameworks that extended their approaches and deepened their development as master teachers.

2009-10 cohort (19 teachers)

These teachers have presented at conferences and/or PD sessions: Megan Ballinger, Janet Benedict, Lorraine Gaugenbaugh, Harry Gee, Aubrey Gibson, Kathy Hoover, Amy McKibben

2010 National Council of Teachers of English Assembly for Research national conference, Pittsburg, PA, February 20

Enciso, P. (chair and presenter), Edmiston, B., Cushman, C. Rhoades, M. & Post, R. (2010, February 20).  “How did we get the two-headed witch?”: Activity theory and cross-site analyses of teachers’ and artists’ practices of ensemble, reading, and representation.

2010-11 2nd cohort (19 teachers)

These teachers have presented at conferences and/or PD sessions: Sandy Guinto, David Hall, Tonya Peacock, Jessica Sharp, Jill Sampson, Alison Volz

2010 National Council of Teachers of English national conference, Orlando, FL, Nov 22

Edmiston, B., Enciso, P., (chair), Cushman, C., Gee, H., & Gaugenbaugh, L. Ambitious Reading: Learning to study and interpret literature through dramatic inquiry.  All-day workshop.

2011 local symposium: Ohio State Othello symposium

5 teachers gave a presentation Feb 12

2011-12 3rd cohort (10 1st/2nd cohort teachers + 3 new teachers)

All three new teachers have presented at conferences and/or PD sessions: Emily Foster Whittaker, Chris Ray, John  Kochensparger

2011 NCTE, national conference, Chicago, Nov 17-19

Balinger, M., Edmiston, B. (chair and presenter), Hall, D., Sampson, J., & Sharp, J.   100 Ways to teach Shakespeare: Teaching Shakespeare like actors, directors, audiences, designers, dramaturgs, and critics.

Cushman. C. (chair and presenter), Gaugenbaugh, L., & Edmiston, B. (discussant).  At the intersection of dramatic play, critical inquiry, and performance in third grade reading instruction: imagining new possibilities for English language learners performing literacy.

2012 OCTELA state conference (Ohio Council of Teachers of English/Language Arts), Worthington, Ohio, March 10

Edmiston, B. (chair), Hall, J., Kochensparger, J., Sharp, J., Sampson, J.  Stand Up For Shakespeare: Reading Complex Texts and Engaging All Students: High School.  (2 sessions)

Edmiston, B. (chair), Guinto, S., Peacock, T., & McKibben, A., Volz, A.  Stand Up For Shakespeare: Reading Complex Texts and Engaging All Students: Middle School. (2 sessions)

Benedict, J., Edmiston, B. (chair), Gaughenbaugh, L, & Gibson, A.  Stand Up For Shakespeare: Reading Complex Texts and Engaging All Students: Elementary.

2012 NCTE national conference, Las Vegas, November 16-17

Edmiston, B. (chair), Sampson, J. & Sharp, J.  100 Ways to teach Shakespeare in Middle and High School: Teaching Shakespeare like actors, directors, audiences, and designers.

Edmiston, B. (chair and presenter), Tabone, C., Sampson, J. & Sharp, J.  100 Ways to teach Shakespeare in Elementary School: Teaching Shakespeare like actors, directors, audiences, and designers.

2013 OCTELA state conference (Ohio Council of Teachers of English/Language Arts), Worthington, Ohio, March 23

Edmiston, B. (chair), Sharp, J., & Sampson, J., (2013, March 23).  Teaching and Learning Shakespeare: Ways in to Complex Texts.

Edmiston, B. (chair), Gaughenbaugh, L., Ballinger, M., & Volz, A.  (2013, March 23).  Teaching and Learning Shakespeare: Active Rehearsal Room Approaches to Reading.

Edmiston, B. (chair), Guinto, S., Hoover, K., & Ray, C. (2013, March 23).  Teaching and Learning Shakespeare: Building a Community of Readers and Writers.

Lorraine Gaugenbaugh is currently teaching the undergraduate section of EDUTL 5101 Teaching & Learning with Drama: Introduction.